Spotlight on Cattaraugus County

 

 

 Cattaraugus Creek running through Zoar Valley (Photo: The Nature Conservancy)

Spotlight on Cattaraugus County

As we head toward victory in 2020, one of our goals is to make our sprawling district feel like one big neighborhood. From Lake Erie to Cayuga Lake, we’re all in this fight together! This week, we’re spotlighting Cattaraugus County.

 

Celebrating Nature in the Enchanted Mountains 

Nestled at the foot of the Appalachian Mountains, Cattaraugus County is known for the wild beauty of its glacier-forged landscape of rugged hills and valleys. Cattaraugus is home to New York’s largest state park, Allegany State Park, a favorite spot for hiking and camping in the warm months and skiing and snowmobiling during the winter. The county also boasts geological marvels like Zoar Valley, a range of steep canyons along Cattaraugus Creek, and Rock City Park, an area of giant rock formations that once formed part of the prehistoric ocean floor. Needless to say, an appreciation for the natural world is intrinsic to the spirit of Cattaraugus.

 
 
Quartz Outcroppings in Rock City Park (Photo: Enchanted Mountains)
 
Cattaraugus Local: Kristin Chambers

Kristin Chambers retired back to the farmland she grew up on in Hinsdale with her husband, Ed Miner, in 2011. They revel in the peace and quiet of country living while also enjoying local activities such as hiking in Pfeiffer Nature Center or Allegany State Park, biking the Allegheny River Valley Trail, attending the horseradish festival in Hinsdale, and the autumn festival in Ellicottville, and dining out at the many wonderful restaurants and breweries throughout the county. 

 

Kristin holding a baby oak ready to go into its forever home

As a volunteer at the Olean Food Pantry and Community Garden, as well as with Veggie Wheels, Kristen sees firsthand the need for major change in the way our country approaches income equality. She and Ed are also deeply concerned about climate change and have planted (at last count) 185 oaks, maples, black cherries, and shagbark hickories to help with carbon sequestration. 

 

Enjoying the view at Pfeiffer Nature Center in Portville (Photo)

We are inspired by the work that Kristin, Ed, and all of our Cattaraugus supporters are doing to make their communities stronger! 

 
From Cattaraugus Creek to Six Mile Creek! 
 
Help build the grassroots network that will lead us to victory in 2020! 
 
Can you chip in today? 

 

 

Life in Cattaraugus 

From the small communities of Lyndon, Delevan, Great Valley, and Randolph, to the cities of Olean and Salamanca, Cattaraugus is connected by scenic waterways and vibrant culture. Agriculture is a major driver of the local economy with 956 farms in the county producing hay, corn, soybeans, oats, berries, dairy, and livestock (source).
 
Cattaraugus County is home to the Seneca Nation of Indians, one of the five nations of the Haudenosaunee. Celebrating its 42nd year, the Seneca Falling Leaves Festival in Salamanca (October 4-6, 2019) brings folks together to honor Seneca culture and enjoy the beautiful fall foliage. 
 
Seneca Falling Leaves Festival, Salamanca (Image Source)
 
Cattaraugus locals and visitors enjoy a host of annual activities and festivals. Summertime is blueberry season, with scores of pick-your-own berry farms opening their fields in mid-July. Local sugar shacks and maple producers open their doors to visitors in March for demonstrations and tastings. Try the maple cream at Boberg’s on Edmunds Road in Delevan! In the summer, stroll the streets in Ellicottville on Friday nights, enjoy an ice cream by the water at the Lime Lake Snack Bar in Machias, or buy some fresh, local produce at the Farmers Market scheduled to open in Olean’s Lincoln Park on the 21st. 
 

Burdick Blueberries on Thompson Road in East Otto (Image

Team Tracy in Cattaraugus 

 
Tracy at a party hosted by Cattaraugus supporters in 2018
 
Betty Darcy and Barbara Dyskant canvassing in Cattaraugus

 

We Need You!

 

Join Team Tracy and help us build our grassroots network of volunteers. We need volunteers to help with social media, making phone calls, scheduling and event planning, letters to the editor, data analysis, research, and more.  
 
 
 
 

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